Bomb seizures spark far-right terror plot fear

Via Diane Denise and Unity:

A network of suspected far-right extremists with access to 300 weapons and 80 bombs has been uncovered by counter-terrorism detectives.

Thirty-two people have been questioned in a police operation that raises the prospect of a right-wing bombing campaign against mosques. Police are said to have recovered a British National party membership card and other right-wing literature during a raid on the home of one suspect charged under the Terrorism Act.

In England’s largest seizure of a suspected terrorist arsenal since the IRA mainland bombings of the early 1990s, rocket launchers, grenades, pipe bombs and dozens of firearms have been recovered in the past six weeks during raids on more than 20 properties. Several people have been charged and more arrests are imminent. Current police activity is linked to arrests in Europe, New Zealand and Australia…

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Nick Lowles
Searchlight
July 2009

With the BNP winning two seats in the European Parliament Nick Lowles looks at where the anti-BNP campaign goes from here…

And!

German pol fined for playing klezmer music
JTA
July 2, 2009

A Dresden politician was fined for playing loud klezmer music outside City Hall to disturb a neo-Nazi march.

Stephan Kuhn of the Green Party was ordered Wednesday to pay a $210 fine, which will benefit an organization that helps victims of right-wing violence.

Neo-Nazis held a commemorative march on Feb.13, 2008, on the anniversary of the World War II firebombing of Dresden by Allied forces, which right-wing extremists have taken to calling the “bombing Holocaust.” In protest, Kuhn blasted the music at the neo-Nazis from the windows of the Green Party parliamentary fraction offices.

According to the indictment, the state prosecutor said it was proven that “loud Jewish music” was played from the window, interrupting a speech that a neo-Nazi was trying to deliver. Kuhn, the state said, thus interfered with the right to free assembly.

Kuhn said he did not regret his actions. “If I was able to stop the flow of brown [Nazi] verbal muck, I am more than willing to accept the payment of a fine,” he told reporters.

Reportedly, in a similar case in 2006, a state prosecutor in Mittenberg, in the former west German state of Baden-Württemberg, dismissed charges against a Catholic priest who rang church bells during a neo-Nazi gathering in the local marketplace.

The members of the far-right National Democratic Party of Germany were unable to continue their rally and filed suit.

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Rock History 101: John Zorn’s Kristallnacht
Adam Kivel
Rock History 101
July 5, 2009

About @ndy

I live in Melbourne, Australia. I like anarchy. I don't like nazis. I enjoy eating pizza and drinking beer. I barrack for the greatest football team on Earth: Collingwood Magpies. The 2019 premiership's a cakewalk for the good old Collingwood.
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2 Responses to Bomb seizures spark far-right terror plot fear

  1. Victor Charlie says:

    Inquiries into a suspected right-wing bombing plot in Britain stretched as far as New Zealand.

    London’s Sunday Times newspaper reported a network of suspected far-right extremists with access to 300 weapons and 80 bombs had been uncovered by counter-terrorism detectives and this discovery was linked to arrests in Europe, New Zealand and Australia.

    But Police Minister Judith Collins’ office told the Dominion Post West Yorkshire police had contacted New Zealand police some months ago asking them to investigate.

    “Nothing came of it and there were no arrests,” a spokesman said.

    Thirty-two people have been questioned in a police operation that raises the prospect of a right-wing bombing campaign against mosques, the Sunday Times said.

    Police are said to have recovered a British National party membership card and other right-wing literature during a raid on the home of one suspect charged under the Terrorism Act.

    source: NZPA

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