2018 Victorian state election : Left / Right : Results!

See : 2018 Victorian state election : far right (and left) candidates (November 10, 2018).

As the results have now been finalised (see : ABC | VEC), I thought I’d take a look and see how the (far) left and the (far) right fared at the 2018 Victorian state election. But before I do, I recommend watching Tom Tanuki’s incisive analysis of some of the more, ah, colourful candidates. (Also, give Mr Tanuki’s new Facebook page a like.)

LEFT

Outside of Labor and the Greens, the main left-wing candidates belonged to the recently-formed (February) Victorian Socialists. While VS ran candidates in every Upper House region and 18 (of 88) seats in the Lower House, most of their energies were focused upon the Northern Metropolitan region, where Steve Jolly was lead candidate. The party fared reasonably well in the region, scoring more votes (4.2%) than all other contestants apart from Labor (42.58%), The Greens (16.76%) and The Liberals (16.48%). VS:

The results are officially in. The Victorian Socialists received 18927 votes for our Upper House ticket in the Northern Metropolitan region.

Unfortunately, despite winning 3771 more votes than Fiona’s Patten’s Reason, her preference deals mean she is taking the 5th spot.

The ALP won 2 places, the Greens and Liberals 1 each.

Thanks again to all our amazing volunteers and voters.

The strength of the campaign and the excellent vote make the case that the Victorian Socialists will not just be some flash in the pan.

Victorian Socialists are here to stay! With a Federal election on the horizon, stay tuned for the next steps.

*Joe Toscano also ran in the seat of Albert Park. He got 282 votes (0.71%).

RIGHT

Australia First

The Australia First Party ran one solitary lonesome single candidate in the election: Susan Jakobi in Cranbourne. Jakobi contested the federal seat of Lalor for the party in 2016, gaining 3,232 (3.0%) votes and placing fifth of five candidates; with the benefit of the donkey vote, in 2018 in Cranbourne, Jakobi got 1,265 votes (2.47%), placing sixth of nine candidates.

Australian Liberty Alliance

The ALA ran one candidate in the Lower House seat of Yan Yean and in every Upper House region. Also having the advantage of securing the donkey vote, Siobhann Brown scored 1,232 votes (2.50%) and came sixth of eight candidates. The contest was notable for the fact that the Liberal candidate, Meralyn Klein, was disendorsed by the party after she appeared in an ALA video. (Members of her extended family actually campaigned against her.)

In the Upper House, the ALA faced off against VS. How did each fare?

Eastern Metropolitan
BIVIECA AQUINO, Indhira : 1,859 / 0.44%
WILDING, Royston : 71 / 0.02% [1,930 / 0.46%]
vs
RUNDLE, Norrian : 1,735 / 0.41%
WARD, Liam : 152 / 0.04% [1,887 / 0.45%]

Northern Metropolitan
GOMEZ, Russell : 1,653 / 0.37%
REISNER, John : 36 / 0.01% [1,689 / 0.38%]
vs
JOLLY, Stephen : 18,200 / 4.04%
BOLTON, Sue : 616 / 0.14%
BOLGER, Colleen : 111 / 0.02% [18,927 / 4.20%]

South-Eastern Metropolitan
MADDISON, David Sydney : 2,291 / 0.52%
SCHUMANN, Ralf : 28 / 0.01% [2,319 / 0.53%]
vs
MYLVAGANAM, Aran : 1,172 / 0.27%
REID, Ben : 59 / 0.01% [1,231 / 0.28%]

Southern Metropolitan Region
YEMINI, Avi : 2,062 / 0.48%
JONES, Kaylah : 13 / 0.00% [2,075 / 0.48%]
vs
LEWIS, Catheryn : 1,935 / 0.45%
MITCHELL, Ivan : 116 / 0.03% [2,051 / 0.48%]

Western Metropolitan
COHEN, Francine : 3,231 / 0.70%
FRANKLIN, Terri : 56 / 0.01% [3,287 / 0.71%]
vs
JORQUERA, Jorge : 2,624 / 0.57%
CHARLES, Andrew : 135 / 0.03% [2,759 / 0.601%]

Eastern Victoria
BROWN, Mark : 2,600 / 0.56%
JONES, Daniel : 52 / 0.01% [2,652 / 0.57%]
vs
CRUSE, Lainie : 971 / 0.21%
FORDEN, Russell : 46 / 0.01% [1,017 / 0.22%]

Northern Victoria
MCDONALD, Ewan : 3,644 / 0.80%
WYLIE, James : 84 / 0.02% [3,728 / 0.82%]
vs
MACDONALD, Moira : 1,240 / 0.27%
McKENNA, Michael : 85 / 0.02% [1,325 / 0.29%]

Western Victoria
NICHOLLS, Kenneth : 2,355 / 0.51%
MACDONALD, Daniel : 30 / 0.01% [2,385 / 0.52%]
vs
GOODEN, Tim : 3,296 / 0.72%
ISKRA, Nada : 110 / 0.02% [3.406 / 0.74%]

Overall Upper House results
AUSTRALIAN LIBERTY ALLIANCE : 20,065 / 0.56%
VICTORIAN SOCIALISTS : 32,603 / 0.91%

Apart from the ALP, the Biggest winner at the election was likely preference whisperer and Derryn Hinch staffer Glenn Druery. Thanks largely to his lucrative backroom shenanigans, the Upper House has been blessed with no fewer than 11 cross-benchers: Greens 1 (-4); Derryn Hinch’s Justice Party 3 (+3); Shooters, Fishers and Farmers 1 (-1); Liberal Democrats 2 (+2); Animal Justice Party 1 (+1); Labour DLP 0 (-1); Fiona Patten’s Reason Party 1 (-); Sustainable Australia 1 (+1); Transport Matters Party 1 (+1); Vote 1 Local Jobs 0 (-1). ABC:

Three other parties are making their debut in state politics: Transport Matters, Animal Justice Party and Sustainable Australia.

Sustainable Australia won a spot despite wining just 1.32 per cent of the vote in Southern Metro, compared to the Greens who were unsuccessful with 13.5 per cent.

The Liberal Democrats in South East Metro won a seat with just 0.84 per cent of the vote.

See also : Ken Knabb on ‘Representative democracy versus delegate democracy’.

Lenin ~versus~ #ausvotes

redflag

Zap! Ka-pow!

A brief guide to the parties on the left contesting the federal 2016 election:

Communist League

In NSW, Ron Poulsen (one of dozens of Ungrouped Independents) is once again having a crack at the Senate. Go Ron!

Socialist Alliance

SAll is running Senate candidates (Ken Canning, Susan Price, Sharlene Leroy-Dyer and Howard Byrnes) in NSW, VIC (Tim Gooden and Lalitha Chelliah) and WA (Farida Iqbal, Kamala Emanuel and Seamus Doherty) and contesting four Lower House seats: Peter Boyle in Sydney (NSW), Zane Alcorn in Wills (VIC), Sue Bull in Corio (VIC) and Chris Jenkins in Fremantle (WA).

Socialist Equality Party

The leadership of the world socialist movement is running Senate candidates in NSW (James Cogan and John Davis), VIC (Chris Sinnema and Peter Byrne) and QLD (Mike Head and Erin Cooke) and contesting the three Lower House seats of Grayndler (NSW: Oscar Grenfell), Gabriela Zabala (NSW: Blaxland) and Wills (VIC: Will Fulgenzi).

Q. Will Fulgenzi (SEP) beat Alcorn (SAll) in Wills?

NB. Sadly, the Communist Party of Australia, the Progressive Labour Party and the Socialist Party will not be fielding any candidates this election. See also : All out to make sure it’s time up for Turnbull (Solidarity, June 11, 2016) and Dump the Liberals, build a socialist movement (Tom Bramble, Red Flag/Socialist Alternative, June 15, 2016).

*Jim Casey (ex-International Socialist Organisation: see SAlt and Solidarity), the Greens candidate for Grayndler, will be facing off against Antony Albanese (along with Oscar Grenfell of the SEP). Casey’s candidacy has been controversial on account of the fact that he doesn’t like capitalism much. See : Jim Casey: ‘We need to build the social movements’ (Interview with Zane Alcorn, Green Left Weekly, February 19, 2016); Anthony Albanese: Labor heavyweight’s Greens rival Jim Casey defends ‘Trotskyist’ speech, Julia Holman, 7.30/ABC, May 11, 2016; Thanks Daily Telegraph, I welcome a debate about the overthrow of capitalism, Jim Casey, The Guardian, May 12, 2016; Jim Casey Talks Preferences, Albo, And Capitalism, Michael Brull, New Matilda, June 17, 2016; Grayndler candidate Jim Casey and the fake-left wing of the Greens, Oscar Grenfell (SEP candidate for Grayndler), wsws.org, June 24, 2016.

Bonus Toscano!

Dr Joe Toscano is running for election again, this time in the VIC seat of Dunkley under the banner of ‘Public Interests Before Corporate Interests’ (PIBCI). He last ran for the state seat of Frankston in 2014 and got 140 votes (0.4%) for his troubles.

See also : antifa notes (june 9, 2016) : australian far right + #ausvotes (June 9, 2016).

Joseph Toscano 4 Higgins

Kinda sorta. Actually, Uncle Joe is using the Higgins by-election (December 5) to draw attention to other matters. His policies are set out in his campaign literature. They include:

    1. establishment of a “people’s bank”;
    2. improved workers’ compensation;
    3. a treaty between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians;
    4. Mabo Day (June 3) to be declared a public holiday;
    5. adoption of the Eureka flag as the national flag of Australia;
    6. reform of the housing sector (in the interests of low-income earners);
    7. an end to public subsidies of private skools and health care providers;
    8. decriminalisation of drug use;
    9. reform of immigration policy (with preference being given to family reunions as opposed to skilled migration);
    10. increased taxes on polluters (as opposed to financial compensation — with such compensation as exists being aimed at workers, not employers);
    11. constitutional reform (allowing for citizens’ initiated referenda);
    12. use of superannuation funds to subsidise the establishment of workers’ co-operatives in non-polluting, socially-useful industry and;
    13. legal recognition of same-sex marriage.

I think the above used to form part of what was once known as ‘social democratic’ politics, of the sort that experienced widespread support among previous generations of Australian workers, and for which the ALP was once, at least theoretically, committed to advancing (and to which a tiny, ‘left-wing’ fringe within the party still retains some adherence — and consequently experiences political maginalisation and irrelevance). Or to put it another way: Bump Me Into Parliament, Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs Jobs… and Working Families Working Families Working Families Working Families Working Families Working Families Working Families.

Bonus!

The Australian Youth Climate Coalition (AYCC) interviews Uncle Joe on climate change and related matters: